Friday, March 23, 2007

The rationale of reason

Have been rather pensive for a couple of days and finally reason shone, much to my dismay as a paradox – Here it comes...

The problem with logic and rationale is that, at the end, you need to balance it out – in the process, what we take with one hand, is given out through the other! Point in fact – The core issue or if I may borrow the heavy word – the quintessential meaning of the thought is reasoned out, and a decision is arrived, by subject to the will or faith, by the view point or the general state of disposition we choose.

Every thing is as much or more, a subject of the will, and reason, logic & critique therefore of anything is just about to get us to a sublimated state of apparent comfort in thought.

Rationality broods rationalism (~sans experience), and rationalism begets reason, and reason subdues the will – the will laughs, saying – you ‘will(ed)’ at the beginning to be rational.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Rationality broods rationalism (~sans experience), and rationalism begets reason, and reason subdues the will – the will laughs, saying – you ‘will(ed)’ at the beginning to be rational.

Where is the flowchart for this?

Vinay Varma said...

The rationate here is quite correct. Quite. Reason never operates in isolation. When we 'think rationally' we are actually balancing the diverse claims of emotions, relations, circumstances, interests, morals, fears, etc.

However we still manage to distinguish 'rational' and 'not so rational' persons. What we term rationality exists under a few varieties based on the primary claim of an overarching factor. 'Cunning' is based on interest - individual benefit; pragmatism on interest - relationally agreeable benefit; wisdom on some assumed transcendental benefit; justification on some emotional or ego non-benefit :). As far as will is concerned, will can either choose benefit or harm. We term something rational when we believe that the decision has been taken for a benefit although what is really beneficially is open to much rational debate. This debate, of course, is settled individually for each person purely on the basis of instinct (unreason or pre-reason, depending upon how you look at it, also possibly post-reason, i.e., when reason fails).

When we say 'will' we often refer to an ability to push all argument aside and go with 'an idea'. Reason informs the will and possibly tempers it. Will follows reason till it can trust reason. Otherwise, it bypasses reason. But reason can never bypass the will, it can only ally with or against the will and it can only bear fruitition through the final say of the will.

Aside: But one thing almost irks me to death and provokes a powerful negative emotional reaction - the famous statement "I am quite an emotional person.' (Which translates into - I can be quite impulsive and inconsiderate because I refuse to understand your reasons). I see the death of reason in that, and that can proke some strong emotions. :)